Cordyceps

8 posts / 0 new
Last post
Arenamontanus Arenamontanus's picture
Cordyceps

Ah, cordyceps! Just look at how it can make spiders beautiful:

http://boingboing.net/2012/06/15/tarantula-with-strange-antler.html

and some of the species near the end of this clip give wonderful visual ideas:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuKjBIBBAL8

Isn't it nice that nature has its own exsurgent virus?

Extropian

Azathoth Azathoth's picture
Re: Cordyceps

I used the cordyceps analogy in one of my games to describe the exsurgent strain the team was facing! :)

I also think protozoans make great real-life inspiration for exsurgent strains. I mean, it makes rat TRY to get eaten by cats. Just replace rats with transhumans, and replace cats with some sort of TITAN meat grinder....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxoplasma_gondii
http://www.corante.com/loom/archives/2006/01/17/the_return_of_the_puppet_masters.php

Anarhista Anarhista's picture
Re: Cordyceps

And does anybody know the name of the parasite that lives in African lakes which after infecting humans starts growing in their bodies up to couple of meters (French doctor who worked on this 'tapeworm' said that removing them is slow and painful process that can last up to couple of days and the worst case was removing 5 meters of parasite trough the patients urethra)...

The interesting part is his claim it influences the victim mind to go to water repeatedly, although he's been telling them that infection is spread through lakes and they know about it... (after it reaches the full growth parasite wants to return to water so it can finish its reproduction cycle)

I don't know about you, but if someone extracted 5m tapeworm trough my urethra during 2-3 days (so it doesn't snap) I'd be avoiding lakes no matter how hot it is!

So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish.

Caretaker Caretaker's picture
Re: Cordyceps

Arenamontanus wrote:

and some of the species near the end of this clip give wonderful visual ideas:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuKjBIBBAL8

Its cool how those fire(-wall) ants move-in and quarantine the infected morph away from the colony.

Arenamontanus Arenamontanus's picture
Re: Cordyceps

Caretaker wrote:
Its cool how those fire(-wall) ants move-in and quarantine the infected morph away from the colony.

Might make a good adventure. Person X has to be removed gently from a habitat before he germinates. Do not upset him, do not give the horror inside a chance to see that anything is happening...

Extropian

Caretaker Caretaker's picture
Re: Cordyceps

Arenamontanus wrote:
Do not upset him, do not give the horror inside a chance to see that anything is happening...

Combine it with the giant jellyfish of Japan:

Quote:

But it may not be so easy. An attempt by the Japanese government to protect fish stocks involved commandeering fishing boats to drag razor-sharp wire through the mass of jellyfish. Yikes! When scientists captured an enemy big female box jellyfish, they found it swollen with millions of eggs - far more than they would normally carry. And the males were carrying billions of sperm. Apparently, threatening the jellyfish unleashes a breeding frenzy. Scientist now believe these Chironex Fleckeri are genetically programmed to ensure their survival by producing more offspring than normal when under attack.

- http://catastrophemap.com/jellyfish_invasion.html
nezumi.hebereke nezumi.hebereke's picture
Re: Cordyceps

I worked for a summer during college in an entemology lab, capturing caterpillars from corn and brassica fields and observing them. About a tenth carried tiny parasites (fly and wasp larvae) that you could sometimes see through the skin. You could tell when it was time because the caterpillars would climb onto the top of the petri dish and just wait there, as the larvae, which were one to twenty tiny, white worms would eat their way through the skin and immediately form cocoons around the slowly dying caterpillar. A few days later, you'd have a new fly or wasp buzzing around the petri dish.

That was a very formative summer.

Arenamontanus Arenamontanus's picture
Re: Cordyceps

Ah, the beauty and wonder of nature! Now let's sing: "All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small..." ;-)

Extropian