Ned's Morph Overhaul

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SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Ned's Morph Overhaul

While working on AUGC I got stuck because the Transhuman Morph Creation System is just too darn long. It has 14 steps, for crying out loud, and a lot of them involve going back to older steps. As a result, I started working on my own shortened and streamlined variant for morph creation, that also happens to include a few features that we don't see in Transhuman, such as letting morphs be slower/faster than default, alternate movement modes for biomorphs, and a handful of other nice things.

It also makes a lot of the stuff less arbitrary, and seeks to answer some questions and balance out things relative to the rulebook; the MCS from Transhuman is a little brutal at times, making it impossible to, among other things, make decently cheap synthmorphs (25 CP off the bat?), and making CP and credit cost directly related (despite the fact that the two have very different game implications). The system I've designed (creatively named the Alternate Morph Creation System) removes a lot of the back-and-forth that you would have to do when using the Transhuman system to give a much quicker, much easier process. Substeps are used when possible, to allow steps to be skipped (for instance, you can just skip the movement mode setting if making a humanoid biomorph). There is also a move away from having three different resources (Real CP, Adjusted CP, and Final CP?) into a separate system with two resources that get converted out into CP and credit costs, making custom morphs actually have credit costs that aren't just 1000 times their CP.

Transhuman also comes with some implications that MCS is built for characters in-universe; the AMCS is built as a tool for GM's to use when designing custom morphs, which means that I designed it with different paradigms in mind.

The AMCS is far from finished. It seems to be throwing out morphs slightly on the cheap end of the spectrum CP-wise. For instance, the Galatea comes out to 45 CP and 35k credits, down from 65 CP/70k, while the Fury costs 75 CP/40k in EP, 55 CP if recreated in Transhuman, and 50 CP/45k in AMCS. I don't think it's broken, however, since I feel like this more accurately values the Fury in relationship to some of the other morphs out there. Unlike Transhuman's MCS, AMCS uses both upward and downward rounding, which removes a reason to throw on 4.5 CP of tiny little improvements that make your morph a pain to record on a character sheet. In addition, AMCS permits the creation of novelty morphs (hopping, swimming, snake-like), that aren't possible for biomorphs/pods in Transhuman's system.

Unrelatedly, if anyone knows where I can locate the base speed for robotic enhancements, that would be wonderful. I know that there are some because one of the cheat sheets I use has them listed, but I can't figure out where it is in the books.

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

Darkening Kaos Darkening Kaos's picture
Ned's Morph Overhaul......Movement Rates

SquireNed wrote:
snip... The system I've designed (creatively named the Alternate Morph Creation System) ....snip

By Armok, you're a rebel!!!!

SquireNed wrote:

Unrelatedly, if anyone knows where I can locate the base speed for robotic enhancements, that would be wonderful. I know that there are some because one of the cheat sheets I use has them listed, but I can't figure out where it is in the books.

Get your data-mining socks on, here's a very old thread discussing that.....
http://www.eclipsephase.com/movement-rates

Your definition of horror is meaningless to me.......
I. Am. A Bay12'er.

Kojak Kojak's picture
SquireNed wrote:Unrelatedly,

SquireNed wrote:
Unrelatedly, if anyone knows where I can locate the base speed for robotic enhancements, that would be wonderful. I know that there are some because one of the cheat sheets I use has them listed, but I can't figure out where it is in the books.

It's in Transhuman, page 218.

"I wonder if in some weird Freudian way, Kojak was sucking on his own head."
- Steve Webster on Kojak's lollipop

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Interesting.

Interesting.

Transhuman suggests a speed cap of 8/40, which is probably accurate for game balance, but isn't really realistic. That translates to about a ~24 mile per hour sprinting speed, which is well and dandy for for Walkers, but modern day humans have broken that record, so think what an Olympian could do.

This is part of the reason that I include the AMCS Traits, so that you can fine tune things. Now that I know where to find the information (literally four pages from where I had Transhuman open, RIP my Research skill), I'll move some of those factors in.

When I get off work tonight I'll be creating a couple more morphs. Holler if there's any particularly design you think is underserved (such as neo-avian), and I'll prioritize that.

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

Trappedinwikipedia Trappedinwikipedia's picture
Not quite, because of the

Not quite, because of the sprint rules an 8/40 morph at a full sprint will actually be moving ~33 MPH, due to the extra 5 meters of movement from a sprint. Faster if you house rule the sprint speed increase to be based on the morph's speed rather than a flat number.

That speed limit is also the combat speed limit, some (shells) can get massively above that number, such as the Security Aircar (8/60 combat speed 200 max speed) or the Transporter (8/40 combat speed 200 max speed). Looking at the robot and vehicle rules most of the walkers have a max speed similar to their run speed, but most of the other movement options get a lot higher. Unfortunately, most morphs lack a max speed stat, but I think the robot and vehicle rules have enough information in them to make some pretty good guesses.

Kojak Kojak's picture
SquireNed wrote:When I get

SquireNed wrote:
When I get off work tonight I'll be creating a couple more morphs. Holler if there's any particularly design you think is underserved (such as neo-avian), and I'll prioritize that.

Neo-avians and neo-octs could both use some love.

"I wonder if in some weird Freudian way, Kojak was sucking on his own head."
- Steve Webster on Kojak's lollipop

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Working on it.

Working on it.

The Blurbird is a neo-avian pod (also, coincidentally, meant for racing, hence the punny name and an incredible lame Star Wars joke about pod racing) designed for a scum barge.

I'm thinking of concepts for an interesting neo-oct that isn't poaching on pre-existing territory. Part of my goal in Ned's Morph Overhaul is to provide an opportunity for uplifts to cheaply replace their morphs if they die, courtesy of a particular neo-avian player of mine (Pól, from the example text, is an NPC in that campaign, and really hates his guts too much to let him resleeve into something nice while aboard the Sodov), offering ~30CP and ~30k credit options for most of the uplifts out there, often with options that don't come stock on the standard morphs (Blurbirds are actually a bit hardy, and they are every bit as fast as the name implies).

Since said character has already been in both flight-capable neo-avians, and his player demands flight, I'm hard-pressed for options to keep him fairly balanced and moving into new and interesting morphs.

EDIT: I also changed the PDF up there, since I had multiple errors in the Blurbird transferring it between character creation and the actual book entry.

EDIT 2: My attempt at an Octomorph case; it actually intends to be decent, but it's ultra-budget and spartan.

Omni-Oct: Built for cheap tourist thrills and the absolutely impoverished neo-octomorph, the Omni-Oct is so bad it can't even use the word “Octopus” in most of its marketing campaigns. Derived from theme park drones, the Omni-Oct is to the octomorph what a case is to an Exalt: a cheap replacement.
Enhancements: Basic Mesh Inserts, Cortical Stack, Cyberbrain, Mnemonic Augmentation, 360-degree Vision, Chemical Sniffer, Extra Limbs (8 Arms).
Mobility System: Walker 4/12
Aptitude Maximum: 20
Durability: 35
Wound Threshold: 7
Advantages: +5 to any aptitude, Armor (4/4)
Disadvantages: Social Stigma (Clanking Masses)
CP Cost: 5
Credit Cost: High

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
I've been trying to reverse

I've been trying to reverse-engineer a morph every day, and also make a new morph.

Today I made my own take on a Reaper/Terminator hybrid (mostly inspired by the Terminator), then compared it to the Terminator using AMCS.

The Reaper wound up cheaper in AMCS than in vanilla, with a CP cost of 90 and a credit cost of 90k (vanilla morphs tend to link up CP and credit cost very well in my system, which is interesting; I forgot to add the aptitude bonuses which led to an 80/80k split in an early test).

The Eradicator runs 60 CP and 75k credits, and it's better armored *and* more durable (prior to structural enhancement), but doesn't have some of the fancy features, such as 360-degree vision or the obscene number of limbs and weapon bristles. The Eradicator also comes with a synthetic mask, because why not?

I'm hoping that AMCS runs no more than a 50% cost discrepancy on the more fluffy vanilla morphs (like the Galatea), and a 10% cost discrepancy on the more realistically balanced ones. I want most of this to be an undershot on CP, since CP as a resource is seriously undervalued in morphs as it stands.

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Bumping because I don't want

Bumping because I don't want to mess up my edit with a huge-big copy paste.

Eradicator: The Eradicator is based off of a series of popular Pre-Fall movies that were produced over the course of centuries. Partly to avoid litigation, and partly to add functionality, features from multiple variants of the characteristic morph were included. A lawsuit determined that the likenesses of dead politicians were permissible for use in morphs, meaning that many of these morphs look suspiciously like an Austrian bodybuilder.
— One note is that the synthetic mask and the weapon mount were not cooperative with each other. The weapon mount is usually in the left arm, and while you can use the hand independently of it, you need to burn through the mask to shoot. On the upside, most people prefer a battle-damaged chic look. - Smith
— Changing the mounted weapon is a pain, too. I usually use a phased plasma rifle in the forty-watt range, which works for just about every situation, really. - Grigor
Enhancements: Cyberbrain, Access Jacks, Basic Mesh Inserts, Puppet Sock, Mnemonic Augmentation, Cortical Stack, Medichines, Reflex Booster, Weapon Mount, Synthetic Mask, Heavy Combat Armor.
Mobility System: Walker 4/20
Aptitude Maximum: 30
Speed Modifier: +1 (Reflex Booster)
Durability: 80
Wound Threshold: 16
Advantages: +5 COO,+10 Ref (Reflex Booster), +10 SOM
CP Cost: 60
Credit Cost: Expensive (Minimum 75,000)
Notes: Weapon mount requires deployment to fire without damage to synthetic mask (makes morph's nature obvious).

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

Kojak Kojak's picture
I love the Eradicator so much

I love the Eradicator so much I'm going to put one of the players in one next session. I'll let you know how it works out for them.

EDIT: And you know goddamn well it's going to look like Ahnold.

"I wonder if in some weird Freudian way, Kojak was sucking on his own head."
- Steve Webster on Kojak's lollipop

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Interestingly, in both AMCS

Interestingly, in both AMCS and the MCS, Durability, Aptitude Maximum, and Synthmorph Armor are all really big-ticket purchases. The Eradicator dumped more than half its cost into its durability and armor (65/124 MP), and that's shaping up to be true almost anywhere. AMCS augmentations tend a bit cheaper than MCS ones, I believe, but even if you were to double the cost of augmentations no morph built under AMCS has ever spent less than half of the final MP cost by step 4. Even the Omni-Oct, crappy as it is, wound up with 4 of its 7 final MP at Step 3, where it shed 20 MP.

I guess you really do get what you pay for, since at least the Durability and Aptitude Maximum are where you get the long-term worth of a morph from.

EDIT: I'm working on a somewhat schlocky morph design tonight.

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Okay, new version up, let me

Okay, new version up, let me go over the full list of morphs in it:

Amorphic: This is a cheap exotic morph. Really created for being interesting, but you could theoretically make an infiltrator or specialist who uses it. Includes advanced rules for dealing with morphs that don't have dedicated limbs and such. Hard to use, because of that -60 integration/alienation penalty. Totally not inspired by a certain web-comic.
Blurbird: The Blurbird is an alternative flying neoavian, because the Chickcharnie just doesn't do it for me. Fast as all get out, and not entirely practical, but it's affordable and really dang fast. Did I mention that it's fast and it flies? What more do you want?
Coriolanus: I've mentioned that I hate the Fenrir execution a lot, so here's my take on it. Better for squad-support, with a single ego. Gives up (almost) all the tank connotations in favor of flying pretty darn fast. It also happens to have more than twice the durability of the Fenrir, which also means that it's nigh-impossible to wound without a critical hit of some sort (or a big gun, such as those found in AUGC).
Eradicator: He's back. This morph is a high-end combat morph for those who can't afford a Reaper, or who want to make an action movie homage. My morph designs trend toward the durable, but the Eradicator has the same toughness as a Fenrir, and armor to match. Beyond that, it's just a decent combat morph, more or less analogous to a Fury made of metal.
Mercury: I can't believe it's not an Amorphic! Seriously, though, the Mercury is to the Amorphic what the Fury is to the Exalt. It's not an across-the-board improvement, but it's somewhat more powerful.
Omni-Oct: Power to the (octopus) people! An affordable octomorph that is more or less a Case analogue. Actually decently powerful, if you're fine with the low aptitude limits, because of the fact that it's got all the octomorph features you love (360-degree vision, anyone)?

The new Amorphic rules are pretty... exotic? I've basically gone full concept mode on them and ignored any sort of balance concern or the like; amorphics take wounds non-stop, but also heal back from them. Their Death Rating is huge, and they heal Wounds before healing durability. They aren't as fast as standard morphs, but they have an arbitrary number of limbs. You'll have a heck of a time sleeving into one (-50 penalty at least), and they have limited armor, but they also recover from unconsciousness quickly, can fit through (but not necessarily into) small spaces, and basically can only be killed with a ton of pain.

EDIT: I've been doing some data analytics while waiting on laundry, and here are some observations I'm drawing from the huge table of morphs I just posted:

High Aptitude Maximums are really rare (fewer than 5% of morphs), but they're not reserved exclusively for high-end morphs. The Digger actually averages less than 1 CP per aptitude limit, but it's not really limited to that.

Durability has little to do with morph cost and the features morphs have, and more to do with whether or not a morph is designed to be tough. A lot of cheap morphs have crummy durability, sure, but the morphs that have a lot of durability make it a core morph focus and it takes up a sizeable chunk of the morph's cost. The Nautiloid has a ~.7 CP:DUR ratio, and the Sundiver has a ~.58 CP:DUR ratio. Fausts, unsurprisingly, have the least DUR to CP in EP (~2.4 CP:DUR), but surprisingly the Rover follows that up with a slightly lower precise 2.4 CP:DUR. The CP:DUR ratio doesn't necessarily measure the cost of durability, but it can roughly infer the amount of durability to cost. Both vanilla Neo-Avians and the Blurbird have more or less the exact same proportional CP:DUR (~1.33r for the blurbird versus 1.25 n-a). The 1.25 ratio tends to be about the golden point where you see "average" morphs, including three or four uplifts, with specialist morphs (like the Faust) sliding toward more CP:DUR and less specialized morphs (Cases or big and touch morphs like the Nautiloid) sliding toward fewer CP:DUR.

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

ThatWhichNeverWas ThatWhichNeverWas's picture
Neo-Avian + Carapace Armor = Fun!

Haven't had a chance to look too deeply into the rules, but they look pretty good so far.
I'll admit I've been hal-heartedly poking at the morph rules myself, so I thought I'd post a few of the thoughts I've had in case you can do something with them :P

1. I'm not entirely sure why movement speed needs to be represented by Traits. Maybe start with a movement type (Ground/Flying/Swiming/FreeFall) as an AUG with a basic cost, and increase speed by increasing the price catagory? - Example: Walking at 4/20 for [low], 6/30 for [moderate], 8/40 for [high]... and I'll totally admit that i've been concidering this as a houserule anyway :P

2. Maybe instead of a flat "Exotic morph" penalty for sleeving, have a leveled trait to apply a bonus/penalty, reducing or increasing the morph's cost as appropriate.

3. Maybe consider allowing Pods to include some synthmorph augments, albeit at increased cost – Armor ratings and weapon mounts being the obvious examples.

A final thought;

SquireNed wrote:
Part of my goal in Ned's Morph Overhaul is to provide an opportunity for uplifts to cheaply replace their morphs if they die, courtesy of a particular neo-avian player of mine (Pól, from the example text, is an NPC in that campaign, and really hates his guts too much to let him resleeve into something nice while aboard the Sodov), offering ~30CP and ~30k credit options for most of the uplifts out there, often with options that don't come stock on the standard morphs (Blurbirds are actually a bit hardy, and they are every bit as fast as the name implies).

I think the lack of Uplift morphs is (partially) intentional - uplifts are supposed to be rare, and the lack of dedicated morphs is a story point.
It's also worth remembering that not everything "needs" to be a dedicated morph - that's what Augmentations are for. If you want something fun for your neo-avian, put him into an octomorph with Wings, or a case with a mobility system and the small size trait.

In the past we've had to compensate for weaknesses, finding quick solutions that only benefit a few.
But what if we never need to feel weak or morally conflicted again?

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
ThatWhichNeverWas wrote:

ThatWhichNeverWas wrote:

I think the lack of Uplift morphs is (partially) intentional - uplifts are supposed to be rare, and the lack of dedicated morphs is a story point.
It's also worth remembering that not everything "needs" to be a dedicated morph - that's what Augmentations are for. If you want something fun for your neo-avian, put him into an octomorph with Wings, or a case with a mobility system and the small size trait.

I was under the impression that there were a limited amount of uplifts, but that morphs that might appeal to those uplifts are not necessarily rare. That is; the uplift process is unique to each species, and as such we're not uplifting every last species out there, and the population of actual uplifts is relatively small. However, with forking, egocasting, and morph tourism, it's not necessarily unbelievable for somewhere that has never been graced by a neo-avian to stock a compatible morph, just for those who want to give flight a spin in something resembling a bird.

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Basilisk: Rumored to come

Basilisk: Rumored to come from Fortea, the Basilisk has impressive stealth capabilities. It is also capable of surviving in space. While it has fine manipulators, it is difficult to carry something while moving in a Basilisk, since it is a quadruped, and any gear must be secured using a harness or strap before the user moves. It makes up for this limitation by including multiple nanotoxin glands and cyberclaws, which a skilled user can deploy very quickly.
— Usually used for security pods, or scaring guests when they drop by customs. - Amadi
— They're less useful against synthmorphs, but don't be fooled; both the Neuropath and the Nutcracker will work on anything.
Enhancements: Basic Mesh Inserts, Cyberbrain, Puppet Sock, Access Jacks, Mnemonic Augmentation, Cortical Stack, Implanted Nanotoxins (Neuropath), Implanted Nanotoxins (Necrosis), Implanted Nanotoxins (Nutcracker), Enhanced Vision, Echolocation, Enhanced Hearing, Enhanced Smell, Polarization Vision, Electrical Sense, Cyberclaws, Carapace Armor, Chameleon Skin, Clean Metabolism, Respirocytes, Vacuum Sealing
Mobility System: Walker 4/28
Aptitude Maximum: 30
Durability: 50 (55 with Respirocytes)
Wound Threshold: 11
Advantages: +10 SOM, +5 INT, Cyberclaws (AP -3, 1d10+2+ SOM ÷ 10), Armor 11/11
Disadvantages: Quadruped
CP Cost: 45
Credit Cost: Expensive (Minimum 70,000)
Notes: Exotic Morph: Quadruped

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

uwtartarus uwtartarus's picture
I love the Eradicator.

I love the Eradicator. Looking forward to an opportunity to deploy one.

Exhuman, and Humanitarian.

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Another really expensive morph.

I wanted to make an alternative really expensive morph for people who don't want a large morph. With that in mind, I present the Chiron. It's really intended as a high-grade Theseus for the party face/brain (and by that I mean it can turn a desk jockey into a glorious physically adept master of his/her/its body).

Chiron: Named after the mythical centaur Chiron, mentor to a host of Greek heroes, the Chiron is a gatecrasher or reclaimer's dream. They're one of the rarest morphs around, but they include a full package of all the things that one would want for going into hostile terrestrial environments. Designed for combat command roles, the Chiron is intended as a replacement for a vehicle when space is limited; each morph comes with a complimentary kit of webbing and heavy body armor for the non-human part of the morph.
- These things are so expensive, you could fit out a whole team in other morphs for a fraction of the cost. - Amadi
- That's kind of the point; the Chiron is the morph you give the guy leading the group who you can't afford to have die. I know a guy on Luna who sold a “gatecrashing” package: five Theseus, one Chiron, and a covert trip to Earth. Cost about a million credits a pop. - Virag
Enhancements: Basic Biomods, Basic Mesh Inserts, Cortical Stack, Bioweave Armor (Light), Direction Sense, Emergency Farcaster, Enhanced Vision, Medichines, Nanophages, Oxygen Reserve, Radiation Sense, T-Ray Emitter, Vacuum Sealing, Toxin Filters, High-G Adaptation, Muscle Augmentation, Neurachem 2, Echolocation, Enhanced Hearing, Eidetic Memory, Math Boosts, Reflex Boosters, Hardened Skeleton, Respirocytes, Digestive Symbiotes, Extra Limbs (2 Arms)
Mobility System: Walker 8/56
Aptitude Maximum: 35
Durability: 80 (95 with Respirocytes, Hardened Skeleton, and High-G Adaptation)
Wound Threshold: 19
Advantages: SOM +10 (+25 with High-G Adaptation, Muscle Augmentation, and Hardened Skeleton), REF +10 (Reflex Boosters), +5 COO, +5 COG, +5 to any aptitude
Disadvantages:
CP Cost: 105
Credit Cost: Expensive (Minimum 130,000)

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
New version up. I added some

New version up. I added some fluff, because why not?

EDIT: Does anyone else feel like a lot of morphs are *not* made for microgravity/vacuum? For instance, not having simple things like magnetic systems.

Likewise, what exactly are the robotic enhancements that allow movement through vacuum? They seem to be limited pretty much exclusively to Thrust Vector, and I think that's probably an error.

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
One quick question for people

One quick question for people:

I've been trying to keep NMO pretty lean; there haven't been any additions other than morph stuff and morph traits. Are there things that people would actually want to see in terms of augmentations, gear, and the like in NMO?

One thing that I've been thinking about are acid/chemical glands. We already have implanted nanotoxins and standard toxins/drugs, so it would be interesting to see morphs with integrated systems for producing chemicals.

I've also been making a lot of synthmorphs, which seems to be in line with the core EP books, but are there people who want to see more biomorph/pod designs?

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

Fenrir Fenrir's picture
Now in Excel

Hey, I made an excel sheet that handles the math for you and creates a convenient template to copy-paste. I built it using pdf version 3. If anyone finds an error, I'm easiest to reach on the EP discord here->https://discord.gg/s4B8NWn

Here is a link to a folder where I'll keep an up-to-date version:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B0xlA7759Uc6ZUctWTVFR3pZblU?usp=sharing

Anyone is free to modify, customize, reuse, repackage, whatever they want with the excel sheet. I post this with permission from Ned.

SquireNed SquireNed's picture
Update!

Two new pods: The Eliza and Delilah

Quote:
Eliza: A few morphological freedom advocates designed the Eliza as a low-cost alternative to the Sylph or Galatea. Although the Eliza wound up costing almost as much as the Galatea, they are much easier to come by. Lacking the biomorph’s more striking good looks, the Eliza provides augmentations that boost the user’s social acumen.
— If you mask the fact that one of these is a pod, it can actually work quite well as a social operator. They’re sort of like high-end pleasure pods if you set them up right, with less of a stigma and a little higher quality on the manufacturing side. -Amadi
— One thing people often overlook about the Eliza is its enhanced sense of smell. It’s very good for hiding emotions and picking up on others’, something that the Galatea simply can’t do and that the Sylph lacks. Don’t mistake them for pleasure pods either; this is a professional’s morph. -Virag
Enhancements: Basic Bimods, Mesh Inserts, Cortical Stack, Cyberbrain, Clean Metabolism, Emotional Dampers, Enhanced Pheromones, Enhanced Smell
Mobility System: Walker 4/20
Aptitude Maximum: 30
Durability: 35
Wound Threshold: 7
Advantages: +10 SAV, +5 COO
Disadvantages: Social Stigma (Pod)
CP Cost: 15
Credit Cost: Expensive

Delilah: An upgraded Eliza, the Delilah is designed for spy work. Able to chat its way past guards, it goes beyond emulating the Sylph to include novel features that enhance information gathering.
— With skinflex, nobody can tell you’re in a pod, either. -Le
— The upgrade to endocrine control from emotional dampers is night and day; but they’re still a pod and you’re not going to see the best build quality on some of these. -Virag
Enhancements: Basic Bimods, Mesh Inserts, Cortical Stack, Cyberbrain, Clean Metabolism, Endocrine Control, Skinflex, Oracles, Enhanced Pheromones, Enhanced Smell, Enhanced Hearing, Chameleon Skin
Mobility System: Walker 4/20
Aptitude Maximum: 30
Durability: 35
Wound Threshold: 7
Advantages: +10 SAV, +5 COO
Disadvantages: Social Stigma (Pod) when Skinflex is not in use.
CP Cost: 25
Credit Cost: Expensive (Minimum 30,000)

Also, I redid the system to have the Social Stigma (Pod) quality calculate, as it does in Transhuman. I think this will bring pods more into line with pods from Eclipse Phase.

There may be a couple new features in the 4th full release that I have forgotten about, as I have not released a new PDF in a while.

Creator of Street Rats, a CC-BY cyberpunk roleplaying game.

Kojak Kojak's picture
Ooh, cool. I always dig your

Ooh, cool. I always dig your stuff, I'm glad to see you posting more.

"I wonder if in some weird Freudian way, Kojak was sucking on his own head."
- Steve Webster on Kojak's lollipop