Optionnal rule idea : Ware limitation by Recharge

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Dany40 Dany40's picture
Optionnal rule idea : Ware limitation by Recharge

Hello,

I thought of a rule that I think is elegant to limit the number of ware that players will add to a morph.
The idea is that beyond a total number of MPs (morph + ware) the morph's ability to recharge decreases.

For example:

01 to 10 MP: short and long recharges as usual
10 to 15 MP: No more than one short recharge per day
15 to 20 MP: No more short recharge, only the long one

What do you think about it ?

This means that existing morph models are optimized for their energy expenditure.
It also means that you can always optimize a morph massively, but it will be for a short action because it will be in excessive use of its energy

Eclipse Phase french fan and Gamemaster until 2014

DivineWrath DivineWrath's picture
I don't like it. Many RPGs I

I don't like it. Many RPGs I've read try to limit the amount of wares you can get, or they put in some sort of drawback for getting wares. I like Eclipse Phase because it has no such system.

BonHed BonHed's picture
Yeah, this is totally against

Yeah, this is totally against the theme of transhumanism. The whole idea is to advance humankind with technology, so having an artificial limiter makes no sense.

Dany40 Dany40's picture
I understand.... but remember

I understand.... but remember that there is an optionnal augmentations limitation rule in 1st edition ;)
It’s just a more elegant rule for me.

Eclipse Phase french fan and Gamemaster until 2014

Xagroth Xagroth's picture
The only problem I see with

The only problem I see with this is that it's a new layer of rules that complicates resleeving, which has been given a revamp to be something to do instead of a rock to trip at.

Remember, the idea is that all gear can be countered, while skills tend to buildupon themselves. So the use of said implants limitation is more for the benefit of the players than for the game's balance...
I mean, if the player's morph is a killing machine loaded with an ungodly amount of implants, they are an egocast away to be forced to do the mission in a flat... and a security check away from being made.

Because, in the end, Eclipse Phase is a game about Transhumanism conspiracies in a future!Cthulhu setting. Having big guns is good to get rid of goons, but not the first recourse. Unless you are a cleaner, that is... but those play more as an FPS than an RPG anyway.

Dany40 Dany40's picture
I fully understand the

I fully understand the reticence with regard to this rule, it is obvious that it is not in the official framework of the game.
However, I remind you that there is an optional official rule "Limited Enhancements" on page 200 of Transhuman... a much more restrictive rule than mine.

Moreover, I think it is necessary to remember that the notion of unlimited energy of the Morphs is not so much assumed in this game universe. Let's remember that the Synths still have to "rest" for two hours a day, which is difficult to justify without the notion of an economical mode of their energy.
Finally, regarding the use of the MP and GP scale, I think we have to keep in mind that these are abstractions. In fact they measure in an abstract way the quantity and quality of technology accumulated on the character... it seems coherent to me to derive an abstract value of energy consumption as well.
It makes sense.

In the end, the essential question is to know if we want to have unlimited improvements of the Morphs without real consequences. Personally I find it potentially interesting to push the player to a choice between the accumulation of raw technological power and his ability to regenerate his special abilities in the short term.
This drawback also seems to me to make sense in the case of the Asynchs. The choice of over-optimization reduces their access to the important effects of the pools on their unique abilities.

Eclipse Phase french fan and Gamemaster until 2014

Xagroth Xagroth's picture
Dany40 wrote:

Dany40 wrote:

Moreover, I think it is necessary to remember that the notion of unlimited energy of the Morphs is not so much assumed in this game universe. Let's remember that the Synths still have to "rest" for two hours a day, which is difficult to justify without the notion of an economical mode of their energy.

I'd say this is because it's assumed that most synthmorphs have batteries and a recharging station to return to, being more economical and safe to do this rather than having all synthmorphs going around with nuclear batteries/generators instead (which was an optional implant in Gatecrashing, for those missions in which you can't trust you'll be able to go back to a charging station in less than 22 hours, something perfectly coherent with the concept of crossing a Stargate and see what's on the other side, with a less than 100% assurance that the gate will open again to the origin base).

Dany40 wrote:

In the end, the essential question is to know if we want to have unlimited improvements of the Morphs without real consequences. Personally I find it potentially interesting to push the player to a choice between the accumulation of raw technological power and his ability to regenerate his special abilities in the short term.
This drawback also seems to me to make sense in the case of the Asynchs. The choice of over-optimization reduces their access to the important effects of the pools on their unique abilities.

Certainly, a limitation on improvements is logical, but the players should not push so much a rule needs to be written regarding how many implants you can carry, simply because then they need to balance what they want with what they can mantain in their body, making any resleeving a process that can take the whole gaming session (which is neither fun, nor optimal).

Also, having all implants always on tends to be better than sometimes getting extra oomph. The balance issues can come from accumulating said extra on the implants full effect, on that I agree, but the players should have a simple rule in mind:
Everything a player does, the GM can make a thousandfold. Which is the reason having munchkins in the group can be good (they take the role no one other wants to and excel at it, allowing the GM to not concoct ways to avoid that area the group is weak at so a TPK is not automatic), neutral (all players and the GM like to play that way, resulting in a "over 9000" game that all enjoy and is balanced) or a problem (if the munchkin tries to be the protagonist in all situations and the rest of the team can't play)

BonHed BonHed's picture
I never read 1st edition,

I never read 1st edition, coming into 2nd fresh.

I don't think the power issue is all that big of a concern (food can give more energy for bio implants, wireless power helps top off batteries, etc.), and personally I am not at all worried about players piling on improvements. The mechanics for cost & recovery time, and the fact that a character is 1 EGO cast away from being in a different morph body, should balance a large number of improvements without adding any additional overhead. I'd use low power for building tension rather than limiting player experience.

I didn't see the optional rule, but if it is even more restricting, I doubt I'd use it. I want players to embrace what it means to be Transhuman, to improve the human condition through technology. If they make hulking killing machines, so be it, I'll throw expert hackers into the mix or let society clamp down on them. Security forces ain't gonna be too happy with 'em wandering around loaded for mecha-bear.

I never liked any of the artificial mechanics for cybernetics in any previous game system. Not because I wanted a cyborg killing machine (which, okay, I do, but still), but because it just felt so artificial. The worst was Shadowrun after the Grimoire came out. Street Samurai would hit a ceiling with the amount of gear they could get, but physical adepts/mages could get more power without suffering the complications the SS would face with a .25 or lower Essence (basically any supernatural creature would own them so hard but a mage would not be so easy).